Archive for ondoy

Philippine News: Is The Philippines Better Prepared For Super Typhoon Parma?

Posted in All About The Philippines, Duke420 Articles, Philippine News with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 2, 2009 by South Arts Festival

Are You Ready For A Super Typhoon?

Are You Ready For A Super Typhoon?

As I write this, news of super typhoon Parma (Pepeng to the Philippines) is on its way bringing a devastating 200+ km/h winds. Weather reports have said that this super typhoon could become even more devastating than tropical storm Ketsana (Ondoy to the Philippines), and we’ve already witnessed the destruction left behind by Ketsana.

The Philippines was shocked by Ketsana, and no one was ever prepared for what was to happen with the massive flooding throughout various parts of Metro Manila and other areas that killed nearly 300 people, left half a million people homeless, and destroyed so much property.

When the Ketsana floods struck, rescue operations were at a snail’s pace, and the Philippine government was indeed ill-equipped to deal with such a disaster. Even now, nearly a week after Ketsana struck – the process of rescue and relief is difficult.

However, when super typhoon Parma hits the Philippines, I believe that the Philippines will be prepared. In fact, the Philippine government and its leaders have already taken the necessary precautions to assure the safety of the Philippines:

1.  PAGASA is ready. PAGASA has already recognized the arrival of Super Typhoon Parma, and has Filipinized it as Super Typhoon Pepeng. This is important to protect our own cultural identity lest we give in again to any kind of colonialism. This strategy to rename the Super Typhoon Parma to Pepeng is also essential in confusing the foreigners abroad when we seek for calamity aid. This is done so that the Philippine Government can seek international financial aid for Super Typhoon Parma, but to show the Philippines that there is no support for Super Typhoon Pepeng in the accounting books. It also works vice-versa – that when they account for the relief for Pepeng, that aid can be easily misplaced to the Parma fund. As an example, a $100 donation to the International Parma Relief Fund will show up as a $5 donation to the Oplan Pepeng Relief Fund, because in essence those are two different funds bearing two different names. So yes, PAGASA is ready.

2. The Philippine National Red Cross is ready. In fact, PNRC Chairman Senator Dick Gordon is already on stand-by in one of 22 rubber boats complete with a team of videographers and photographers to document his selfless action of rescuing the helpless victims of super typhoon Parma. In fact, even before the storm hits, PNRC Chairman Dick Gordon already has his victims rescued, and the two disabled elderly women bearing twin babies is on standby with him on the rubber boat as well.

3. The MMDA is ready. MMDA Chairman Bayani Fernando has already admitted that the insufficient drainage and irrigation due to the garbage from recent typhoon Ketsana/Ondoy was his fault. That way when super typhoon Parma/Pepeng hits, then he will no longer be held liable since he already admitted to his blunder.

4. Philippine Congress is ready. Philippine Congress is already on standby to make speedy enactment on laws while everybody else is busy doing relief operations. During typhoon Ketsana/Ondoy, pro-administration Representatives were able to railroad the impeachment complaint due to the absence of opposition Representatives. This time, the pro-administration will be ready to railroad the Reproductive Health Bill among other things.

5. The Local Water Utilities Administration is ready. The LWUA Chairman Prospero Pichay is making sure that all the water utilities will be working to provide uncontaminated water for the victims of Super Typhoon Parma. In fact, LWUA Chairman Prospero Pichay had also prepared a lavish seven-course feast, consisting of baked musselss, lechon, kare-kare, chicken barbecue and salpicado in commemoration of the LWUA’s 36th anniversary during the height of Typhoon Ketsana/Ondoy, but was only able to feed a handful of victims that included President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, Cabinet Secretary Silvestre Bello III, Executive Secretary Eduardo Ermita and political adviser Gabriel Claudio among others.

6. Henry’s Catering Service is ready. Many Filipino citizens around Metro Manila have been doing their part in preparing meals and packing relief goods to help out the half a million homeless Filipinos, who weren’t able to eat for several days since they were waiting to be rescued. However, Henry’s Catering Service has been prepared to cater to the meetings of the National Disaster Coordinating Council connected with relief operations for typhoon Ondoy. Henry’s Catering Service is also responsible for the quick response in putting together the lavish feast for the 36th anniversary celebration of the LWUA among other feats.

7. The National Disaster Coordinating Council is ready. They improved their rubber boat count from 22 to 30, and have increased the number of lifevests for their office by 10.

8. Congressman Mikey Arroyo is ready. His stockpile of tequila is unmatched.

9. President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo is ready. In fact, she’s been the most prepared of everyone. Even before typhoon Ketsana/Ondoy hit, she had already put aside some cash for emergency situations. Considering her very diligent experience in putting aside funds for a rainy day, you know for sure that President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo is well prepared. Certainly, should Super Typhoon Parma/Pepeng cause an unparalleled disaster to the Philippines, she has prepared her emergency kit, made sure her valuables and loved ones (not necessarily in that order) are taken care of,  and that she is ready to evacuate if need be. In fact, we should all emulate her example and also be prepared.

How about you? Are you prepared?

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Philippine News: The Philippine National Red Cross Now Accepts Donations Via Paypal

Posted in All About The Philippines, Duke420 Articles, Philippine Current Events, Philippine News with tags , , , , on September 30, 2009 by South Arts Festival

More Than 300,000 Filipinos Left Homeless

More Than 300,000 Filipinos Left Homeless

You would think that an organization like the Red Cross would have everything covered. Well, so things are slow in the Philippines. But finally, someone in the Philippine National Red Cross has taken the initiative to set up an account so that PayPal members can finally send donations. This is especially important at this state of calamity after the passing of tropical storm Ketsana (aka Ondoy here in the Philippines) wreaked havoc in various parts of the country.

Anyway, you may direct your donations to give@redcross.org.ph.

“Danghang Salamat, Ondoy” by Ramil Digal Gulle

Posted in All About The Philippines, Philippine Current Events, Philippine Events with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 27, 2009 by South Arts Festival

[The Following Excerpt Was Written by Ramil Digal Gulle, And I Am Just Re-posting His Inspiring Message Here]

All I wanted to do on Saturday morning was to go to my doctor. After getting off the MRT station in Kamuning (about 10 am) I waded through ankle-deep floodwaters to accompany my wife to the TV station where she works. The rest of the day was already clear in my head: Go to the doctor, finish my business there by around lunchtime (there are usually quite a number of patients, and I wasn’t expecting to finish earlier than that), pick up my wife and we go home for some needed time with the kids.

I thought nothing of it when the doctor’s nurse texted me to say that the doctor’s clinic was already flooded. The clinic is in the low-lying Kamias area. Fine, I told myself, I’ll just go to Hi-Top and buy a bottle of wine and ingredients for dinner. My daughter had requested that I cook for dinner.

After Hi-Top, I proceeded to the TV station where my wife works. I was walking the whole time because of the rain. I felt no danger despite the rain. The rain wasn’t that strong by the time I left Hi-Top. Then I reached the corner of Panay Avenue and Sergeant Esguerra. Holy shit. The floodwaters were neck-deep in Esguerra!

I turned left on Panay, planning to take the train at the Quezon Avenue MRT then disembark at Kamuning station, so I could just walk towards the TV station. I reached Hen Lin (a Chinese fastfood) which is right under the MRT station. I was surprised to see that Edsa was flooded. The area in front of the McDonald’s outlet was waist-deep in flood.

There was a guy—he was soaked from head-to-foot—who was warning people getting off the Quezon Avenue MRT station. He was telling everyone who could hear him: “O, wag na kayo dyan sa Esguerra. Hanggang leeg doon. Dito sa may Edsa hanggang baywang. Mamili na lang kayo kung saan niyo gustong magpakamatay.”

[Don’t go to Esguerra. The water there is neck-deep. Over there at Edsa it’s waist-deep. You guys choose which side you prefer. You choose where you want to kill yourself.]

The guy was trying to be funny. I went up the MRT station, boarded the train and got off at Kamuning. When I reached the TV station, my wife texted me that she won’t be going home. All TV news staff were required to stay because of widespread flooding.

I called the kids at home. Thank God there wasn’t too much rain in Cavite. Finally, I saw what was happening in Marikina and Rizal on the TV set at the visitor’s area. Shit. I won’t be able to go home. Then I also learned that the way to Cavite was impassable.

After talking to my 9-year-old daughter some more and assessing that Cavite would likely not be affected by the typhoon, I made up my mind to wait for my wife. I didn’t think it would be a good idea to let her go home alone, with floodwaters rising in Quezon City.

People were coming to the TV station. Every single one was asking for help. They had loved ones trapped inside their house by floodwaters. There were loved ones already on rooftops. The floods were rising too fast in some areas. And so began my long day: filled with the weeping of women, worries about friends trapped in rooftops, worries about my kids (what if the typhoon turns and hits Cavite?), and a feeling of utter helplessness.

My wife worked till about midnight. We tried to get to Cavite but even before we reached the tollgate of the expressway leading to Bacoor, huge trucks were already turning back. We were in a cab. I decided not to risk whatever was ahead. There could have been floods, an accident, etc.

My daughter kept calling my mobile phone. She was crying. When were we going to get home? After getting assured that there was no flooding in Cavite, that our kids were not in danger of any flood, I told my wife we should just wait for morning. We turned back and stayed in a hotel—the hotel lobby to be exact. All the rooms were booked. It was already 2am. We couldn’t sleep. We simply waited till the sun was up.

When I finally got home today, the first thing I did was gather wife and kids for prayers. We prayed out of gratitude. We were all safe. Then we prayed for all those who were still trapped, who were still struggling to stay alive amid floodwaters. I was crying.

I find myself unable to sleep after being awake since 6 am yesterday morning. I’m still keyed up. My wife’s asleep, finally, after getting a massage. I want to sleep but each time I manage to doze off, I jerk awake at the slightest noise. So I’ll just write.

I can’t get the sound of weeping mothers out of my head. That’s how I spent the night while stranded in Quezon City. All these mothers kept talking about their kids. One mother, Lina, could not help but cry for her kids, who were trapped in the third storey of a neighbor’s house for out eight hours already by the time she spoke to me. Her husband was also trapped by floodwaters—he could not leave his office in Quezon City.

Here are some things I learned from the experience. I can write them down in the comfort of home with my wife and kids safely with me. I actually feel guilty that I’m in this situation. I feel guilty that I’m not out there on a rubber boat saving people. So I’ll write some more and go to bed. After I get some sleep, I might have a saner perspective.

Our families are not prepared for climate change. Typhoon Ondoy was true to its name, which means “little boy”—it wasn’t a supertyphoon. And yet, we all failed in so many fronts.

In our own home, we don’t have an emergency kit. The flashlight is no longer where I always put it. Furthermore, I’m not aware of any evacuation plan in our community. Who do we call? Where do we evacuate when waters start rising? I have no idea. It’s the sort of ignorance that kills.

One friend of mine lost her possessions in the floods. Her husband and kids are safe. She had the quick and sensible thinking to have her family evacuate shortly after the water began seeping into their house and after the power was cut off. They left everything and booked themselves in a hotel. “I lost everything,” she told me over her mobile phone. I told her that the most important things in her life were saved.

Our government—both the national government and the LGUs–is not prepared for climate change. If people are safe now—relatively, for some, because it’s again starting to rain and many are still trapped on rooftops, awaiting rescue—it’s because of prayer. So many people were—are still—praying. It seems the prayers were heard because we all got a respite from the rain.

Filipinos have a saying, “Nasa Diyos ang awa, nasa tao ang gawa” (God dispenses mercy but man has to do the work). God has already dispensed his mercy. Will we do our part?

There’s no excuse for the lack of rubber boats, for example. We have floods every year. But every year, we are unprepared. The two rubber boats that began rescuing people in Marikina were a relief to know about, but why only two?

Philippine National Red Cross Chairman Dick Gordon tried to transport several more rubber boats but these had to come all the way from Olongapo. And with the traffic jams at the expressways, they could not get to Metro Manila in time.

The headquarters of the National Disaster Coordinating Council and the headquarters of the Armed Forces of the Philippines are both in Quezon City. And yet, for nearly 12 hours, Quezon City residents trapped in floods could not be rescued. The AFP, if I remember correctly, usually has the biggest slice of the national budget every year. But where were the choppers? Where were the rubber boats? Clearly something is very wrong.

Then we recall how General Carlos Garcia, former AFP comptroller, was caught (by US authorities, not by Philippine authorities) trying to bring in millions of pesos in cash to the US. It does not inspire faith in the military leadership.

We also recall a lot of things that are disquieting: government resources being used to secure a questionable telecoms deal with a Chinese firm; millions of pesos spent on Presidential dinners abroad; millions of pesos in campaign contributions unaccounted for; millions of pesos spent on a California mansion; billions of pesos spent on foreign trips; and a cancelled plan to buy a new Presidential jet.

How do you explain all that to kids trapped on their rooftop for nearly 24 hours—soaking wet, hungry, crying for their mothers and going insane with fear?

How do you explain the fact that the government can spend millions upon millions on so many other projects, but could only produce two rubber boats to rescue scores of residents trapped in a flooded Marikina village? How do you explain the President’s lobster and steak dinners to Rizal residents neck-deep in muddy floodwaters?

Every year, we get floods and typhoons. Every year, we give money to the AFP and the NDCC. And all that the Marikina residents get are two rubber boats?

And wasn’t Marikina always being trumpeted as some sort of “First World City in a Third World Country”? Clean and green Marikina. Disciplined Marikina, a jewel of law and order in the chaos of the Mega Manila.

The Marikina River floods every year. Every year. But when it really mattered, the City Government of Marikina did not have enough emergency equipment, did not have enough rubber boats. Or if it did, it did not have the capacity to deploy these resources in time. It seemed to have no plan for the evacuation of residents at Provident Village before floodwaters could reach it.

And former Marikina mayor Bayani Fernando wants to run the rest of the country the way he did Marikina—or at least, that’s the impression we get. We could be wrong.

To be fair, none of us expected something like Typhoon Ondoy. But the lack of rubber boats, the seeming lack of coordinated response, the empty promises made over the media—these are simply not acceptable. These do not inspire our confidence in government once the next super typhoon hits. I mentioned Marikina only as an example.

I’m not blaming Fernando or his wife (the present Marikina mayor). I’m just stating how things appear. The real story about the slow rescue, etc. might unfold in the next few days.

[Kris Aquino was talking on TV about Marikina rescue efforts. She said that according to one Marikina resident, there were rubber boats deployed by the Marikina government–but the river’s currents were so strong that the rubber boats got overturned. It was also pointed out that Marikina Mayor Marides Fernando did everything she could but “nature’s wrath” was just too powerful. In the interest of fairness I should point this out.]

What happened to Marikina can happen anywhere. The local governments of Bulacan, Pasig and Rizal fared no better. Are our local governments prepared for climate change? Are they prepared for typhoons like Ondoy, or much stronger ones? Your guess is as good as mine.

What would have happened if Ondoy didn’t leave the country in the hours following the massive flooding? What if it was a super typhoon that decided to stay for a few days?

The answer is so obvious that we’re scared to state it: Death and Chaos. So many people, so many children will die. Our loved ones will die. We will die.

The next few days, weeks and months will tell us whether the government cares to prevent this, or whether it wants to use climate change as a kind of population control.

The government’s priorities have been clear in the way it spends its money and allocates its resources. For example, the AFP budget keeps growing. But what about the budget for the national weather agency PAGASA (Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Service Administration)? There were reports a few years back that the budget was actually slashed.

During a report on GMA-7 news last night, PAGASA OIC Nathaniel Cruz said that there was a piece of equipment that could help the agency estimate a typhoon’s potential amount of rainfall (very useful in the case of Ondoy, which poured a month’s worth of rainfall in about five hours)—a Doppler radar. Does PAGASA have this equipment?

No. The national weather agency, the only one that could warn us if we should evacuate because a typhoon will bring a deluge, does not have a Doppler radar. But it’s on its way, clarifies Cruz.

PAGASA, in Filipino, also means “Hope”. Based on how the government seems to prioritize PAGASA, the weather agency, do we have reason to hope?

It was drummed into my head a long time ago that when we use the term “government” in a democracy, we should really refer to ourselves. After all, in a democracy, governance must be by, of and for the people.

So it’s either we’re not really a democracy (because we always stand back and just let a bunch of evil yoyos run things for us) or we’re all just not getting this governance thing right. We’re not governing things the way we should.

It’s raining again. I hope we get our acts together soon.

Philippines Current Events: Coordinating Disaster Is A Disaster For National Disaster Coordinating Councild

Posted in All About The Philippines, Duke420 Articles, Philippine Current Events, Philippine News with tags , , , , , , , , , , on September 27, 2009 by South Arts Festival

I don’t like the National Disaster Coordinating Council of the Philippines. Simply because they lack COORDINATION! It’s a given that Ondoy has brought so much damage to property, to homes, and not to mention the thousands of people who had to be evacuated.

Coordinating rescue operations is no joke, but it’s rather such a disappointment that they couldn’t get something going quickly enough. After all, it’s a matter of coordination. If the NDCC receives a call for help, then they coordinate the efforts with the nearest rescue operation unit  in that area – whether it be hospital, police or barangay. From there, the local rescue unit will give an assessment of the situation, (i.e. “we cannot get to those victims due to severe floods.”)

From that point the NDCC will coordinate this information to those who can do something about the situation, such as the Philippine Air Force, Coast Guard, Navy, or maybe they might have their own special equipment or task force that can respond to the call since the local unit cannot, and then THAT is dispatched with the utmost emergency. And then coordinate a place with which they can use for evacuation. After all, you don’t just rescue the cat from a tree just to leave him in a pit of dogs.

The NDCC Cannot Coordinate This Disaster

The NDCC Cannot Coordinate This Disaster

What happened to yesterday’s disaster because of Ondoy had the phone lines of the NDCC on fire, and yet without anyone to really provide the proper coordination in order to get things done. The slow process of bureaucracy before Defense Secretary Gilbert Teodoro could mobilize anything is just not acceptable when lives and property are at stake, especially those who stand to lose EVERYTHING.

Sorry – Gilbert Teodoro – but you just lost my vote.

Then, there’s that NDCC Deputy Director Anthony Golez Jr., who I believe may have a good heart, but just looks like a total dweeb. Anthony Golez Jr., in an interview with ABS-CBN, asked for an apology for the delayed effort in the rescue operations, citing that the flood made things difficult. Sorry – Anthony  Golez Jr. – I was taught to produce results and not excuses, and I can’t believe you even had the time to conduct an interview to apologize instead of getting on that damn phone and finding more trucks and more rubber boats and more choppers, or coordinating more evacuation centers.

Then, when he was asked if school and work would be suspended, Anthony Golez Jr. quipped something like it would depend on the bureaucracy. Apparently, there is a criteria that must be followed for the suspension of classes or work, or the declaration of any calamity, and it has such a frigging red-tape process. (you may check it out here). It’s no wonder kids take the dangerous trek to school at 5Am and get to school on time at 7am, only to find out that government will suspend classes at 11am (government work starts at 8am or 9am.) By that time – the situation of the weather is near disastrous, and students are stranded.

So, anyway, Anthony Golez Jr. can’t say if there are no classes or work on Monday because some government offices are closed on Sunday, and no one is around to write the memo. If you look at the red tape process of suspending classes and work by the NDCC, you will understand the importance of the memo.

Apart from the rescue operations, the NDCC should have better coordination in the gathering of information as to those that may need relief. They should also coordinate all the efforts of volunteer groups and point them to designated areas. They should also coordinate the charity and relief assistance from various groups to send out to evacuation centers or disaster areas. COORDINATION – it’s in their job description.

Instead, what’s going on now, is that several groups and foundations have risen up to volunteer their services, and yet they are like headless chickens running around. Sure, ABSCBN is doing a tele-thon and getting donations  with even the supposed head of Coca-Cola – pledging 2 million bottles of Wilkins drinking water. Fine – it sounds good on television, but I want those 2 million bottles now! I want 10,000 of those put on a truck and sent to Marikina. I want 10,000 more sent to Rizal. I want 20,000 more floated down the Pasig river to reach homes that cannot be reached. I want immediate action through coordination. I want to see the pledged 2 million water bottles making its way somewhere it is needed. Instead, it might take 2 weeks for me to ever see those bottles, and some might just find its way to a studio set and not to a relief center.

The Red Cross have their hotlines. ABSCBN Foundation have their own fund-raiser. Politicians and presidential aspirants are setting up their own relief  centers. – those are all good. But then, eventually, there has to be someone at the top of all that to say, “ABSCBN release that 1 million peso donation so we can rent out 5 choppers to do rescue operations. NOW!”

We need someone to say,  “Red Cross! Shell out Php100,000 so we can run gensets at the evacuation centers, and put cots and blankets, and give medication…”

The good will of the people and their good intentions to help their fellow Filipinos is fine, but it’s the coordination of important action that is needed during a state of calamity that is truly lacking. We may have saved a child from drowning in the flood, but if we put that child  in a place that has no food or medicine or warmth from the storm, then we just gave that child a new place to die. We didn’t save that child at all.

If there is no one in charge with that kind of capacity, power or responsibility, to command that kind of action from local government units, NGO’s, or from private groups, then there is no point in putting up a National Disaster Coordinating Council if they cannot coordinate such things at a time of disaster.

In other countries, like the US – when a policeman needs to accost your vehicle to chase a suspect, then he gets it by flashing a badge and without questions asked. And if he wrecks it, then it will be cared for by the government. That kind of authority empowering a simple police officer allows things to get done in terms of results. We have to put that in a bigger scale in order to mobilize things at a time of disaster, at a state of calamity.

Anyway, the National Disaster Coordinating Council can begin the change by upgrading the NDCC website to make it look like a site of action, and not just a mere web-brochure on press releases about agreements made for fudning. I’m beginnning to get the feeling that the NDCC is a lobbyist group in search of relief, instead of an action group. If it were action, then the first page of their site should be a form for an incident report, or a hotline number in big bold letters. And don’t forget to check the NDCC contacts directory (the number of Golez isn’t even there!). If the primary contact number of the NDCC is the “Webnaster”, then we are truly screwed. And if the alignment of the NDCC contacts directory page is anything to consider on how to coordinate things – then God save us all because the NDCC surely doesn’t look capable at all.

Don’t even get me started with the Office of Civil Defense (OCD.)

Anyway, I was just informed that there is an online  Rescue InfoHub Central. I’m just uncertain how this works, or who’s responsible or on top of this, but it’s disconcerting that there are only 200 incident reports with everything that is going on.

I just really wish that the coordination of this disaster be swift. It is frustrating to think that with all the cooks in the kitchen, the efforts for rescue, relief and rehabilitation will be delayed in bureaucracy. Before you know it – the funds raised will be used for an election campaign, or some other misappropriate use.

By the way – President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo‘s office has been rather quiet.

Philippine News: World-Record Rainfall In The Philippines Brings Serious Flooding To Country

Posted in All About The Philippines with tags , , , , , , , on September 26, 2009 by South Arts Festival

Ondoy – not such a flashy name, but it’s definitely a name that won’t ever be forgotten. Typhoon Ondoy was responsible for the serious flooding of Metro Manila and various parts of the Philippines in world-record-breaking fashion.

Ondoy Floods The Philippines

Ondoy Floods The Philippines

The very famous Hurrican Katrina that devastated Louisiana dumped over an inch of rainfall for 3 hours and another .5 inches per hour over the next 5 hours back in 2005. Ondoy dumped an average of 2.24 inches per hour for six hours, and is still going – although at a lesser rate.

Of course, if you were anywhere in Metro Manila yesterday, I’m sure you would’ve felt the havoc and disaster caused by Ondoy. Several homes were flooded which forced residents to climb to the roofs of their houses. Traffic was at a standstill as cars stalled and were buried under the flood water. Then thousands upon thousands of people had to endure waist-high (even neck-high) flooding.

The local TV news will show you ghastly images, and certainly there are thousands of pictures and videos being uploaded to show you the kind of impact Ondoy had.

On a personal note – I believe I was rather fortunate. I had left my home at 830 in the morning to set up for the Earthdance Manila event. I met up with my good friend Vernon “DJ Spoonman” Perez as were to oversee the ingress of equipment and booths at the La Mesa Eco Park in Quezon City – a good two hours away from my house under regular traffic.

However, the build up of rain by 9:30 already made roads impassable as floodwaters began to rise. I was lucky enough to seek shelter away from the traffic on our way back to Makati – failing even to reach halfway to the La Mesa Eco Park. We were coordinating with Earthdance organizers to agree to postpone the event, which was quickly agreed upon considering the storm that was brewing (literally!).

Traffic didn’t ease up, and we mananged to reach Makati by noon. We were stranded there for a good part of the day. It wasn’t until the evening (around 7PM) that I thought of making the trek back home to Paranaque, but was concerned with the closure of the South Super Highway due to heavy floods and congested traffic. I was also informed that my mother and my sister were trying to check in at a Makati hotel, having left their vehicle in the Taft area flood, and just commuting via MRT and LRT to Makati amidst the stampeding mob of wet commuters. Luckily for them, I was able to get them in the car and find an easy route back home via the Skyway. All in all – it took me the regular 30 minutes to return home from Makati what others took 4 to 5 hours. Like I said – I was one of the fortunate ones.

For several thousands of people – typhoon Ondoy meant losing cars, losing homes and even losing the lives of loved ones.

At present, the Philippine Coast Guard, Philippine Navy, Philippine National Red Cross, Philippine Air Force,Armed Forces of the Philippines and Metro Manila Developmental Authority are conducting rescue operations along with key local government units. Aspiring presidentiables have also cracked open their mouths to invite everyone to contribute relief goods and assistance to the disaster victims, although I have some skepticism if some donations will go directly into their campaign funds. Maybe not a lot, but maybe some.

In any case, there are serious issues that will need to be resolved following this calamity. In the meantime, considering contacting these groups on information about rescue operations and relief assistance:

National Disaster Coordinating Council (NDCC) Emergency Numbers: 912-5668, 911-1406, 912-2665, 911-5061.

Red Cross Flood Rescue Donations: text RED <Space> AMOUNT to 2899 (Globe) or 4483 (Smart)

To See The BBC Video of Ondoy’s Devastating Effects, Click Here.

Philippine Events: Earthdance Manila 2009 Postponed

Posted in All About The Philippines, Duke420 Articles, Philippine Events with tags , , , on September 26, 2009 by South Arts Festival

Tropical Storm Ondoy (Ketsana) Floods Metro Manila

Tropical Storm Ondoy (Ketsana) Floods Metro Manila

Dear Friends,

Due to circumstances beyond our control, such as Mother Nature, we have decided to move the Earthdance Manila 2009 celebrations to next week. We will announce the date and time when the production team has had a chance to meet.

As much as it would’ve been a wonderful experience to celebrate Earthdance synchronized with the rest of the world, we really have to humble ourselves to Mother Nature, and allow her to do her thing. It’s actually rather funny how such a circumstance has to happen to the Philippines, but then again I guess we have yet another reason to stand out from the rest of the world. So while the rest of the world will be synchronized in their celebrations, we will just have to wait a week after – on delayed telecast – as most of us in the Philippines would understand.

Nevertheless, the spirit of oneness and peace that Earthdance stands for is not lost just because of our delayed event. I’d like to believe that we carry this spirit with us in our daily lives, and beyond one event. So even if we may not be in synch with the rest of the world, we will still have a cause to celebrate. And next week, we will still carry the same program for all those who will participate.

In the meantime, should the weather get better, then perhaps we will have a more intimate celebration to coincide with the global prayer that was schedule at 7am of Septemeber 27. If there are those who are still interested in gathering later to celebrate Earthdance in a more modest (and certainly drier) fashion, then send me an SMS, so we can inform you of the contingency plan. It may not be the same hype that was promised, but it is still an opportunity to get together and share our energy with the rest of the world in celebration of peace. And then, there’s still next week to look forward to, and certainly with more sunshine. However, the weather and the situation and the disaster makes this gathering seem impossible. Nevertheless…

In the spirit of Earthdance, we would like everyone to tune in some positive energy at 7PM (wherever you are) for the mitigation of Ondoy and its effects throughout our country, and also for the unity and peace around the world. Thank you for your intentions.

Thank you to all for understanding, and we hope to see you next week.

Love and Light.

JJ Duque