Archive for the Philippine Events Category

Philippine Events: Olive Magazine Launched At Ayala Museum

Posted in All About The Philippines, Duke420 Articles, Philippine Events, Philippine News with tags , , , , , , , , , , on November 20, 2010 by JJ Duque

I arrived late at the recent Olive magazine launch held at the Ayala Museum lobby just this week. I immediately greeted Bella Luce Publications big boss Nick Tuason, and gave my heartfelt congratulations for another magazine under his belt. So far, Bella Luce Publications has Wedding Belle, Digital Photographer, Lonely Planet Philippines, iCreate, Junior and now Olive!

Olive Magazine Now In The Philippines

Olive Magazine Now In The Philippines

Olive is a monthly magazine published in the UK by BBC Worldwide, and Bella Luce Publications have been able to get the license to open up a local version of Olive here in the Philippines.  Here in the Philippines, the magazine’s editor-in-chief is none other than Stephanie Zubiri, who earned her star in the culinary scene with the very reputable The Modern Epicurian Kitchen – an institution which is part cooking school-slash-catering business that promotes the fine art of living, and the process and results that are part of that palatable journey. Definitely, Olive is blessed to have someone like Stephanie Zubiri, who exudes a good energy and has a fresh perspective on the culinary scene in the Philippines and abroad.

While I didn’t get to congratulate Stephanie Zubiri personally that night (she was too busy being hounded by everyone else), I managed to pass along the message through her brother and old friend Senator Miguel Zubiri, who was with his beautiful wife Audrey. My congratulations also to the ever efficient people of Bella Luce Publications like Marta Luque-Araneta, Pilar Tuason and Madie Pfiffner-Dinglasan.

It was a fun night overall – and it was great to see friends like Audrey Carpio, Joanna DeOcampo, Jackie Verano, Jay Pou, Cay Rodriguez-Araneta, Fiona Lucas-Araneta, Pip Zorgani, RJ Ledesma and his wife Vanessa, and Ines Cabarrus, who will be having a second run of the annual Manila’s Best Kept Restaurant Secrets Awards soon.

My only concern – I feel like I should be the one to say it – is that the open bar wasn’t running as optimal as I would’ve expected, considering that it was the launch of a culinary magazine. You just simply can’t serve warm beer over ice on a wine glass, nor can you serve wine on a margarita glass. The lack of glassware to match the cocktails was befuddling. I would’ve thought that the launch of a top culinary magazine would’ve hired a caterer equal to the task of serving Manila’s glitzy set. The caterer should’ve known to have chilled the beer earlier, and prepare the right glassware for the occassion. I mean – if it were the launch of an un-culinary magazine, then this faux pas could’ve been forgiven. I just had to say – not to bitch – but to raise constructive criticism for the caterer, or maybe just to the poor schmuck responsible for hiring them.

But then again, that’s just the open bar – and I’m sure that slight glitch won’t take away anything from the greatness of the magazine, which will certainly continue to have an impact on the Manila food and restaurant scene. There will be great articles in Olive, ranging from exciting recipes, restaurant reviews and so much more, and it comes at a great time in Philippine lifestyle history when our range of tastes and foods has started to expand.

Once upon a time, you would mention a handful of good restaurants when you mention Japanese cuisine or Chinese cuisine. Now – there are too many to mention because of the growth of the restaurant and food service industry throughout the country. The launching of Olive will certainly be a critical portal which will open many eyes to the wonders of the food scene in the Philippines as well as share articles from the mother publication of BBC Worldwide.

Needless to say – you should go find a copy of Olive soon.

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$2 Million Guaranteed at Asia Poker Tour Philippines Main Event

Posted in All About The Philippines, Philippine Events, Philippines Sports with tags , , , on June 1, 2010 by JJ Duque

2010 Asian Poker Tour in August 2010

The Asian Poker Tour (APT) will have its 2010 Main Event at the Resorts World Manila, Philippines, from August 23 to August 29, 2010. The buy-in for the Main Event is $2,500 + $200,  and the prize pool is a whopping $2 Million guaranteed, so far the biggest pot ever to hit the Philippine shores.

I’ll hope to get in the money.

Philippine Events: Rogue Magazine’s Black Tie Brawl Was A Knockout

Posted in All About The Philippines, Duke420 Articles, Philippine Events, Philippine News, Philippines Sports with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 28, 2009 by JJ Duque

For anyone who knows me – you know that I’m a jeans, t-shirt and sneakers kinda guy. I prefer to dress comfortably lest I be labeled as a metrosexual. Not that I have anything against metrosexuals, but I just enjoy the anonymity of regular citizen fashion as opposed to the semi-flashy casual-collared and leather-shoed wear.

However, I can dress for the occasion as need be, and do adhere to the strict dress codes, although my gift of gab and fine reputation does allow me to bend the rules to my favor at times – like say, getting into Establishment with a pair of sneakers when the place calls for more appropriate footwear.

Anywho – when Rogue Magazine’s Managing Director Katrina Tuason extended an invitation to attend the Black Tie Brawl at the Renaissance Hotel ballroom, she insisted that it’s strictly formal attire. She knew I loved my jeans and tee look, but she kept texting me constant reminders – “Don’t forget it’s formal, and you’re sitting on my table.” Aaaahh – the pressure to not embarrass my ‘date’.

I went deep into my closet to raise my formal wear from the dead, found my tux shirt, the bow tie (damn, I haven’t tied this in 10 years!) and brought out the sleek black Cashmere suit. The last time I donned a tuxedo was in the United States more than a decade ago. You hardly wear a tux in the Philippines, or maybe I just don’t get invited enough to parties where you could wear a tux. And well – the transformation from plain Joe to Joe Black was quite a change indeed.

“Wow, JJ! You look like James Bond.”

“Huh? James Bond? Excuse me, I’m Bruce Wayne. I’m a brat billionaire, and don’t need government to pay for my gadgets.”

I arrived an hour past the 7pm call time just right in time for the table seating. I doubled-down on the Maker’s Mark Kentucky bourbon whiskey to catch up, and eventually made my way to my seat beside Rogue Magazine Editor-in-Chief Jose Mari Ugarte, his lovely wife and ExcelAsia CEO Rita Trillo-Ugarte, Design Editor Miguel Mari and his better-half Managing Editor Carmela Lopa, photographer Mark Nicdao, Rogue covergirl Angel Locsin and her pretty friend, whose eyes left an impression, but sadly her name escapes me.

Our table was just right behind the judges and committee panel of executives from the Games and Amusement Board (GAB) and just an arm’s length away from the ring. Really up close and personal with the possibility of blood, sweat and tears splattering on the Mustard Crusted Beef Tenderloin in Whiskey Pepper Sauce. (Kudos, to Renaissance Hotel Restaurant Director Javi Berenguer-Testa)

Razorback opened the festivities with a rocking version of the Philippine National Anthem, followed by a rude awakening of Voodoo Who Do?. Then, the ring girls were introduced – Rogue cover girls Sanya Smith, Ornusssa Cadness and Rogue mannequin Mia Ayesa – and the heat factor in the Renaissance ballroom making things a little sweaty under the bow tie.

Without further delays – MC Boyet Sison gave the lowdown on the rules, and got the fights underway. Eight bloody bouts from Pinweight to Heavyweight with a main event Flyweight championship were listed on the card, organized by URCC big boss Alvin Aguilar.

Charlie Angel Kicks Alvin Ramirez At The Rogue Black Tie Brawl

Charlie Angel Kicks Alvin Ramirez At The Rogue Black Tie Brawl

Large quantities of Maker’s Mark makes it hard to remember who beat who right now, but there was a submission by rear-naked choke, there was a KO induced by a flying knee to the face, there was a TKO by strikes.

I do recall going 3-0 on my picks for the first three fight. I recall cheering on Charlie Angel to beat Alvin Ramirez, just because we had an Angel (Locsin) on our table and because if you added an S to his name, he would be Charlie’s Angels. Of course, the Angel won.

Then, the Kentucky bourbon hit hard when I got depressed when Bimbe Perez of my home gym Elorde MMA was outclassed and eventually submitted by Eric Kelly of Yaw Yan Ardigma. That kept me quiet from jeering (as opposed to cheering.)

The Flyweight championship main event went the full two ten-minute rounds, and even needed an extra five-minute tie breaker as challenger Jilmar “Stonecold” Tangayan of Cenojas MMA and Kevin “The Silencer” Belingon of Lakay Wushu went all-out toe-to-toe with URCC Flyweight champion Kevin Belingon eventually retaining his title.

The after party at Cinna Bar of the Renaisssance Hotel was equally festive. Single malt crazy with The Macallan. Got KOed myself when I hit the sack at dawn. (I don’t recall if the sack hit me back).

That same morning, the remnants of Bruce Wayne were ready for the dry-cleaners, and hopefully it wouldn’t take a decade to unearth again.

Oh wait – for sure, in next year’s Rogue’s Black Tie Brawl.

Philippine Events: Big Fish Manila Presents Paul Van Dyk

Posted in All About The Philippines, Duke420 Articles, Philippine Events, Philippine Music with tags , , , , , , , , , , on October 6, 2009 by JJ Duque

Paul van Dyk is among the top deejays in the world, and to experience Paul van Dyk live is definitely something you cannot pass up. And now, the Philippines will have the opoprtunity to witness Paul van Dyk live when he plays live at the A-Venue Events Hall along Makati Avenue on October 13, 2009. Paul van Dyk will certainly mesmerize everyone with his trance music, and it will definitely be one party you will remember for the rest of your life.

Personally, I’m quite excited. It’s not quite often that you get a deejay with the caliber of Paul van Dyk visiting the country, so I am certainly looking forward to this rare event. Also, it’ll be great to experience Big Fish resident deejay Johnboy Lee, who will open up for Paul van Dyk.

A big heap of gratitude to the great minds of Big Fish Manila, who are responsible for bringing some of the best parties to Philippine shores. Big Fish Manila has brought in the likes of Hed Kandi, Slinky, Armin van Buuren, Housexy, God’s Kitchen and Ministry of Sound. Those are really big names in the electronic music industry, and certainly very crazy memorable events.

Paul van Dyk was named World’s No. 1 DJ by DJ Magazine in 2005 and 2006, and has remained in the Top 10 since 1998. As of 2007, Paul van Dyk has sold more than 3 million albums worldwide.

Tickets and VIP tables are now up for reservations with Big Fish Manila. Just call (632) 6327762 or (632)6348238.

For a bit of a preview, here is the very famous For An Angel by Paul Van Dyk – in a 2009 remix.



“Danghang Salamat, Ondoy” by Ramil Digal Gulle

Posted in All About The Philippines, Philippine Current Events, Philippine Events with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 27, 2009 by JJ Duque

[The Following Excerpt Was Written by Ramil Digal Gulle, And I Am Just Re-posting His Inspiring Message Here]

All I wanted to do on Saturday morning was to go to my doctor. After getting off the MRT station in Kamuning (about 10 am) I waded through ankle-deep floodwaters to accompany my wife to the TV station where she works. The rest of the day was already clear in my head: Go to the doctor, finish my business there by around lunchtime (there are usually quite a number of patients, and I wasn’t expecting to finish earlier than that), pick up my wife and we go home for some needed time with the kids.

I thought nothing of it when the doctor’s nurse texted me to say that the doctor’s clinic was already flooded. The clinic is in the low-lying Kamias area. Fine, I told myself, I’ll just go to Hi-Top and buy a bottle of wine and ingredients for dinner. My daughter had requested that I cook for dinner.

After Hi-Top, I proceeded to the TV station where my wife works. I was walking the whole time because of the rain. I felt no danger despite the rain. The rain wasn’t that strong by the time I left Hi-Top. Then I reached the corner of Panay Avenue and Sergeant Esguerra. Holy shit. The floodwaters were neck-deep in Esguerra!

I turned left on Panay, planning to take the train at the Quezon Avenue MRT then disembark at Kamuning station, so I could just walk towards the TV station. I reached Hen Lin (a Chinese fastfood) which is right under the MRT station. I was surprised to see that Edsa was flooded. The area in front of the McDonald’s outlet was waist-deep in flood.

There was a guy—he was soaked from head-to-foot—who was warning people getting off the Quezon Avenue MRT station. He was telling everyone who could hear him: “O, wag na kayo dyan sa Esguerra. Hanggang leeg doon. Dito sa may Edsa hanggang baywang. Mamili na lang kayo kung saan niyo gustong magpakamatay.”

[Don’t go to Esguerra. The water there is neck-deep. Over there at Edsa it’s waist-deep. You guys choose which side you prefer. You choose where you want to kill yourself.]

The guy was trying to be funny. I went up the MRT station, boarded the train and got off at Kamuning. When I reached the TV station, my wife texted me that she won’t be going home. All TV news staff were required to stay because of widespread flooding.

I called the kids at home. Thank God there wasn’t too much rain in Cavite. Finally, I saw what was happening in Marikina and Rizal on the TV set at the visitor’s area. Shit. I won’t be able to go home. Then I also learned that the way to Cavite was impassable.

After talking to my 9-year-old daughter some more and assessing that Cavite would likely not be affected by the typhoon, I made up my mind to wait for my wife. I didn’t think it would be a good idea to let her go home alone, with floodwaters rising in Quezon City.

People were coming to the TV station. Every single one was asking for help. They had loved ones trapped inside their house by floodwaters. There were loved ones already on rooftops. The floods were rising too fast in some areas. And so began my long day: filled with the weeping of women, worries about friends trapped in rooftops, worries about my kids (what if the typhoon turns and hits Cavite?), and a feeling of utter helplessness.

My wife worked till about midnight. We tried to get to Cavite but even before we reached the tollgate of the expressway leading to Bacoor, huge trucks were already turning back. We were in a cab. I decided not to risk whatever was ahead. There could have been floods, an accident, etc.

My daughter kept calling my mobile phone. She was crying. When were we going to get home? After getting assured that there was no flooding in Cavite, that our kids were not in danger of any flood, I told my wife we should just wait for morning. We turned back and stayed in a hotel—the hotel lobby to be exact. All the rooms were booked. It was already 2am. We couldn’t sleep. We simply waited till the sun was up.

When I finally got home today, the first thing I did was gather wife and kids for prayers. We prayed out of gratitude. We were all safe. Then we prayed for all those who were still trapped, who were still struggling to stay alive amid floodwaters. I was crying.

I find myself unable to sleep after being awake since 6 am yesterday morning. I’m still keyed up. My wife’s asleep, finally, after getting a massage. I want to sleep but each time I manage to doze off, I jerk awake at the slightest noise. So I’ll just write.

I can’t get the sound of weeping mothers out of my head. That’s how I spent the night while stranded in Quezon City. All these mothers kept talking about their kids. One mother, Lina, could not help but cry for her kids, who were trapped in the third storey of a neighbor’s house for out eight hours already by the time she spoke to me. Her husband was also trapped by floodwaters—he could not leave his office in Quezon City.

Here are some things I learned from the experience. I can write them down in the comfort of home with my wife and kids safely with me. I actually feel guilty that I’m in this situation. I feel guilty that I’m not out there on a rubber boat saving people. So I’ll write some more and go to bed. After I get some sleep, I might have a saner perspective.

Our families are not prepared for climate change. Typhoon Ondoy was true to its name, which means “little boy”—it wasn’t a supertyphoon. And yet, we all failed in so many fronts.

In our own home, we don’t have an emergency kit. The flashlight is no longer where I always put it. Furthermore, I’m not aware of any evacuation plan in our community. Who do we call? Where do we evacuate when waters start rising? I have no idea. It’s the sort of ignorance that kills.

One friend of mine lost her possessions in the floods. Her husband and kids are safe. She had the quick and sensible thinking to have her family evacuate shortly after the water began seeping into their house and after the power was cut off. They left everything and booked themselves in a hotel. “I lost everything,” she told me over her mobile phone. I told her that the most important things in her life were saved.

Our government—both the national government and the LGUs–is not prepared for climate change. If people are safe now—relatively, for some, because it’s again starting to rain and many are still trapped on rooftops, awaiting rescue—it’s because of prayer. So many people were—are still—praying. It seems the prayers were heard because we all got a respite from the rain.

Filipinos have a saying, “Nasa Diyos ang awa, nasa tao ang gawa” (God dispenses mercy but man has to do the work). God has already dispensed his mercy. Will we do our part?

There’s no excuse for the lack of rubber boats, for example. We have floods every year. But every year, we are unprepared. The two rubber boats that began rescuing people in Marikina were a relief to know about, but why only two?

Philippine National Red Cross Chairman Dick Gordon tried to transport several more rubber boats but these had to come all the way from Olongapo. And with the traffic jams at the expressways, they could not get to Metro Manila in time.

The headquarters of the National Disaster Coordinating Council and the headquarters of the Armed Forces of the Philippines are both in Quezon City. And yet, for nearly 12 hours, Quezon City residents trapped in floods could not be rescued. The AFP, if I remember correctly, usually has the biggest slice of the national budget every year. But where were the choppers? Where were the rubber boats? Clearly something is very wrong.

Then we recall how General Carlos Garcia, former AFP comptroller, was caught (by US authorities, not by Philippine authorities) trying to bring in millions of pesos in cash to the US. It does not inspire faith in the military leadership.

We also recall a lot of things that are disquieting: government resources being used to secure a questionable telecoms deal with a Chinese firm; millions of pesos spent on Presidential dinners abroad; millions of pesos in campaign contributions unaccounted for; millions of pesos spent on a California mansion; billions of pesos spent on foreign trips; and a cancelled plan to buy a new Presidential jet.

How do you explain all that to kids trapped on their rooftop for nearly 24 hours—soaking wet, hungry, crying for their mothers and going insane with fear?

How do you explain the fact that the government can spend millions upon millions on so many other projects, but could only produce two rubber boats to rescue scores of residents trapped in a flooded Marikina village? How do you explain the President’s lobster and steak dinners to Rizal residents neck-deep in muddy floodwaters?

Every year, we get floods and typhoons. Every year, we give money to the AFP and the NDCC. And all that the Marikina residents get are two rubber boats?

And wasn’t Marikina always being trumpeted as some sort of “First World City in a Third World Country”? Clean and green Marikina. Disciplined Marikina, a jewel of law and order in the chaos of the Mega Manila.

The Marikina River floods every year. Every year. But when it really mattered, the City Government of Marikina did not have enough emergency equipment, did not have enough rubber boats. Or if it did, it did not have the capacity to deploy these resources in time. It seemed to have no plan for the evacuation of residents at Provident Village before floodwaters could reach it.

And former Marikina mayor Bayani Fernando wants to run the rest of the country the way he did Marikina—or at least, that’s the impression we get. We could be wrong.

To be fair, none of us expected something like Typhoon Ondoy. But the lack of rubber boats, the seeming lack of coordinated response, the empty promises made over the media—these are simply not acceptable. These do not inspire our confidence in government once the next super typhoon hits. I mentioned Marikina only as an example.

I’m not blaming Fernando or his wife (the present Marikina mayor). I’m just stating how things appear. The real story about the slow rescue, etc. might unfold in the next few days.

[Kris Aquino was talking on TV about Marikina rescue efforts. She said that according to one Marikina resident, there were rubber boats deployed by the Marikina government–but the river’s currents were so strong that the rubber boats got overturned. It was also pointed out that Marikina Mayor Marides Fernando did everything she could but “nature’s wrath” was just too powerful. In the interest of fairness I should point this out.]

What happened to Marikina can happen anywhere. The local governments of Bulacan, Pasig and Rizal fared no better. Are our local governments prepared for climate change? Are they prepared for typhoons like Ondoy, or much stronger ones? Your guess is as good as mine.

What would have happened if Ondoy didn’t leave the country in the hours following the massive flooding? What if it was a super typhoon that decided to stay for a few days?

The answer is so obvious that we’re scared to state it: Death and Chaos. So many people, so many children will die. Our loved ones will die. We will die.

The next few days, weeks and months will tell us whether the government cares to prevent this, or whether it wants to use climate change as a kind of population control.

The government’s priorities have been clear in the way it spends its money and allocates its resources. For example, the AFP budget keeps growing. But what about the budget for the national weather agency PAGASA (Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Service Administration)? There were reports a few years back that the budget was actually slashed.

During a report on GMA-7 news last night, PAGASA OIC Nathaniel Cruz said that there was a piece of equipment that could help the agency estimate a typhoon’s potential amount of rainfall (very useful in the case of Ondoy, which poured a month’s worth of rainfall in about five hours)—a Doppler radar. Does PAGASA have this equipment?

No. The national weather agency, the only one that could warn us if we should evacuate because a typhoon will bring a deluge, does not have a Doppler radar. But it’s on its way, clarifies Cruz.

PAGASA, in Filipino, also means “Hope”. Based on how the government seems to prioritize PAGASA, the weather agency, do we have reason to hope?

It was drummed into my head a long time ago that when we use the term “government” in a democracy, we should really refer to ourselves. After all, in a democracy, governance must be by, of and for the people.

So it’s either we’re not really a democracy (because we always stand back and just let a bunch of evil yoyos run things for us) or we’re all just not getting this governance thing right. We’re not governing things the way we should.

It’s raining again. I hope we get our acts together soon.

Philippine Events: Earthdance Manila 2009 Postponed

Posted in All About The Philippines, Duke420 Articles, Philippine Events with tags , , , on September 26, 2009 by JJ Duque

Tropical Storm Ondoy (Ketsana) Floods Metro Manila

Tropical Storm Ondoy (Ketsana) Floods Metro Manila

Dear Friends,

Due to circumstances beyond our control, such as Mother Nature, we have decided to move the Earthdance Manila 2009 celebrations to next week. We will announce the date and time when the production team has had a chance to meet.

As much as it would’ve been a wonderful experience to celebrate Earthdance synchronized with the rest of the world, we really have to humble ourselves to Mother Nature, and allow her to do her thing. It’s actually rather funny how such a circumstance has to happen to the Philippines, but then again I guess we have yet another reason to stand out from the rest of the world. So while the rest of the world will be synchronized in their celebrations, we will just have to wait a week after – on delayed telecast – as most of us in the Philippines would understand.

Nevertheless, the spirit of oneness and peace that Earthdance stands for is not lost just because of our delayed event. I’d like to believe that we carry this spirit with us in our daily lives, and beyond one event. So even if we may not be in synch with the rest of the world, we will still have a cause to celebrate. And next week, we will still carry the same program for all those who will participate.

In the meantime, should the weather get better, then perhaps we will have a more intimate celebration to coincide with the global prayer that was schedule at 7am of Septemeber 27. If there are those who are still interested in gathering later to celebrate Earthdance in a more modest (and certainly drier) fashion, then send me an SMS, so we can inform you of the contingency plan. It may not be the same hype that was promised, but it is still an opportunity to get together and share our energy with the rest of the world in celebration of peace. And then, there’s still next week to look forward to, and certainly with more sunshine. However, the weather and the situation and the disaster makes this gathering seem impossible. Nevertheless…

In the spirit of Earthdance, we would like everyone to tune in some positive energy at 7PM (wherever you are) for the mitigation of Ondoy and its effects throughout our country, and also for the unity and peace around the world. Thank you for your intentions.

Thank you to all for understanding, and we hope to see you next week.

Love and Light.

JJ Duque

Philippine Events: Rogue Magazine Launches New Media Division With A Huge Party

Posted in All About The Philippines, Duke420 Articles, Philippine Events with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on September 24, 2009 by JJ Duque

My dear friend Katrina Tuason, who is also the marketing director for Rogue Magazine sent out the invitations for the launch of Rogue Magazine’s New Media Division, and immediately I got excited.

I remember the topic of New Media being thrown around the Rogue office for quite some time, and then finally, they just made it happen. They launched Rouge.ph, and Rogue Live, which is basically vidoe clips of several Rogue events and Rogue exlcusive interviews that have been made digitally available on-line. With the help of pelicola.tv, Rogue gets to add more meat behind just being a simple magazine, to becoming a new media. Not only will you get the Rogue-ish articles on the magazine, but you’ll also get to treat yourself with video content that includes exclusive footage of their shoots and in-depth interviews.

DJ Junior Sanchez with ME!

DJ Junior Sanchez with ME!

They kicked off the launch with a huge party at White Space along Pasong Tamo, which featured also the introduction and launch as well of the BMW Z4. Another cool highlight of the night was also the music courtesy of DJ Junior Sanchez, who is one of the legendary deejays to come out of New York City. In fact, when I once lived there in the early 90’s,  I already knew of  DJ Junior Sanchez, and had seen him spinning in house parties at SoHo.

Anyway, so Dj Junior Sanchez rocks a set that has everyone dancing away. Good vibes. And after his set DJ Mars Miranda closes off, and everyone is still going ballistic, including Dj Junior Sanchez, who seemed like he was having a blast. And certainly that was what everyone was having.

An overflow of food catered by Cibo Di M plus all-out open bar on Rene Barbier wines, San Miguel beer and some vodka and some whiskey. Nice for everyone indeed.

Big congratulations to Katrina Tuason, Miguel Mari and Josemari Ugarte for the huge success of the Rogue New Media launch.

Do I have to list the who’s who of who went? Nahhh! As if we need our names published ala high-society style. You knew that if you were there, then you wouldn’t complain. Good party. Period.